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Full text of "Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Parks Monthly Report, September 1919"

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 
YELLOWSTONE PARK, WYO. 

HE SUPERINTENDENT 

Copy from 



143 



51 N T H L Y REPORT 



for 



eptember, 
1919. 



,. ■ 






EPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOF 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

YELLOWSTONE PARK. WYO. 



IH-I 



iFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



October 10, 1919. 



The Director, 
National Park Service, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: 

The following is my report on conditions in Yellow- 
stone National Park and on the operation of the park for the 
month of September, 1919: 

GENERAL CONDITIONS; 

Bain fell in quantities on eleven different days well 
distributed throughout the month. The total precipitation was 
equal to 2.51 inches of water. In this is included 7.9 inches 
of snow reduced to water. The total is 1.5, or about double, the 
average precipitation for the month of September, based on a record 
of thirty years, and only one September during the thirty years, 
when 2.85 inches of moisture were recorded, was this record ex- 
ceeded. The snowfall of 7.9 inches beat the September record for 
30 years. Following a period of three months with scarcely any 
rain whatever with a consequent epidemic of forest fires of con- 
siderable size, this rain and snow were most welcome. But it 
came too late to mend much of the damage done to the winter range 
for stock and wild animals, though the grass in the mountains did 
revive to some extent. A copy of the monthly Meteorological 
Summary is inclosed herewith. 

Travel. 

The heavy travel of the previous months kept up well 
during September. The season for rail tourists closed on 
September 20, and hotels, permanent camps, the bath-house at 
Upper Basin, and the picture shops, closed on that date. The 
general stores at Mammoth Hot Springs and Upper Geyser Basin 
remained open throughout the month, to accommodate private auto- 
mobile travel, which continued to the end of September. The 
tables on page give details of travel for the month and for the 
season, which are most interesting. The total of is beyond 

any prediction, and beats any previous year's travel (51,895 in 
1915) by about per cent. A notable fact in connection with 
private automobile travel is that of about 40,000 coming to the 



-1- 



park in their own oars, about 25 per cent were from the State of 
Montana. 

She roads in the parte remained in good condition to the 
end of the season, and complaints in regard to them were rarely 
heard. 

labor and Supply markets . 

There was no particular change in the labor conditions 
in and around the Dark. Vie still had difficulty in securing the 
services of enough men to carry on our work, and had to raise the 
price for common labor effective September 12, from #3.76 to ^4.00 
per day, and skilled labor in proportion, in order to keep the 
men we already had. We also sent agents to Salt Lake City, Utah, 
and Missoula, Montana, to get men, and they were none too success- 
ful. The concessioners encountered the same difficulties, though 
in their oases it was not so important to hold the help, as they 
were prepared to begin to lay them off as travel gradually 
dwindled towards the end of the season. 

But about October 1st it was decided to discontinue our 
various lines of work in the field as rapidly as transportation 
faoilities would permit, as labor is high and expensive, the 
weather is uncertain, making the cost of construction and main- 
tenance work higher in proportion, and we found our funds getting 
low and it is desirable to hold some for necessary winter work 
and for opening the roads in the spring before the season begins 
and before the next year's appropriation will become available. 

II. PEESOHKEL: 

Employees . 

On September 1st there were 331 employees on our rolls: 
on September 30th there were 288. Below is given a list of the 
numbers of various classes of employees serving under appointment, 
with general statement of the kind of work performed by each class: 



M. 


Class. 


1 


Foreman 


2 


Assistant Engineers 


1 


Assistant Engineer 



Clerks 



Electricians 

Buffalo Herder 
Buffalo Keeper 
Foreman 

Handyman 
Lineman 

" atahman 
Vaster Mechanic 
Mechanics 

Plumber 



Kind of work performed . 

In charge of all engineering work 
in the park under direction of the 
Super intenden t. 

In charge of section of road work. 

Office engineering and special survey 
work. 

1 Disbursing agent and purchasing 
clerk; 1 on vouchers; 1 on orders 
and proposals; 1 on information and 
general clerical work; (1st to 15th) 
stenographer, files and revenues; 

(loth to 30th) 1 stenographer, files, 
and revenues: (1st to 16th) 1 on 
payrolls and timekeeping; 1 cost 
clerk in charge of storehouse. 

1 in charge of power plant; 2 
assistants in power plant. 

V.'ork with tame buffalo herd. 

In charge of tame buffalo herd. 

8 in charge of road maintenance 
crews, and 1 stable foreman. 

>Vork in commissary, rationing crews, etc. 

In charge of telephone system. Bid 
emergency work and installed instru- 
ments . 

NJ^ht watchman at Headquarters. 

In charge of shops. 

One in charge of auto and truck 
repair shop; 1 repairing and driv- 
ing trucks. 

In charge of general plumbing at 
headquarters. 



-3- 



No . 

1 



Class . 

Telegraph operator 



Kind ££. work performed . 

telegraph operator and general office 
work. 



Telephone operators Telephone switchboard operators, 
Steward & Mstr. Trans. In charge of Transportation. 
Auto mechanic Repairing motorcycles. 

Chauffeur Driving trucks. 



Gas engine/nan 
Asst. Chief Hangers 



Driving caterpillar tractor. 

One Acting Chief Ranger, in charge 
of ranger force; 1 in charge of 
ranger work in southern section; 1 
in charge of ranger work in western 
section; 1 on long patrols through- 
oat the park. 

49 Park rangers In charge of different stations; 

on duty in Ohief Ranger's Office; 
fire natrols and fighting fire; 
motorcycle patrols; checking auto- 
mobiles; assisting rangers in 
charge of stations. 

Sane of these employees were carried only a portion of 
the month. Most of the suraner r&ngers employed temporarily for 
the tourist season only were laid off about the middle of Sept- 
ember. 

In addition to regular employees mentioned above, the 
following list of temporary laborers, truck drivers, etc., were 
employed: 

On Sent. 1 . On Sent. 3Q . 

Truck drivers 12 io 

Laborers 137 128 

Teamsters 44 39 

Special laborers 29 26 

Carpenters 3 5 

Cooks 12 12 

Waiters 6 6 

Painters 3. 1 



-4- 



Daring September annual leave was granted as follows: 

James MoBride, Assistant Chief Ranger, September 8 to 
9, inclusive; 2 days. 

Alexander 8. Wiley, Cleric, September 17 to 24, inclu- 
sive; 7 days. 

Laurence Mazzanovich, tark Ranger, September 23 to 27. 
inclusive; 5 days. 

William J. O'Laughlin, Blacksmith, September 24 to 27, 
inclusive; 4 days. 

Valden H. Pendell , Clerk, September 30 (noon) to 30 , 
inolusive ; \ day. 

George V/inn, Park Ranger, September 20 to 29, inclusive; 
8 days. 

P. J. Townsend, Park Ranger, September 20 to 30, in- 
clusive; 9 days. 

Appointment a and Promotions . 

The following appointments became effective during the 
month of September: 

John L. Cooper, auto mechanic, ,120 per month, effective Sept. 1. 
Edward W. McLennan, chauffeur, ,1080 per annum, ■ 9. 

August C. Neumann, painter, vlOO per month, ■ ■ 12. 

Seorge K. Owen, park ranger, $1200 per annum, " 16. 

Bert S. Reese, park ranger, .,1200 per annum, 1. 

Dorsey R. Sherman, gas engineman, v 100 per month, ■ 9. 

Resignations . 

The following resignations took effect during September: 

Alexander C. Wiley, Clerk, effective close of Sept. 24, 1919. 
Laurence Mazzanovivh, park ranger, close of Sept. 27, 1919. 



-5- 



The following vacancies existed at the close of the 
month: 

1 Chief Banger. 

1 Assistant Buffalo Herder. 

(It is not advisable to appoint a chief ranger at this 
time. Ample opportunity should he given the ranger force to dem- 
onstrate their fitness fir this position, as it is highly desir- 
able to fill it by promotion, if possible. To fill this place 
from outside would be detrimental to the morale of the force. 

III. WCBK COMPLETED: 

(a) Construction of Pay steal L-iprovemant s . 

Construction work during the past month has progressed 
quite rapidly, and all crews have been confined to this class of 
work. The contractor for the under-pass bridge near Sylvan Pass 
has the work 60 per cent completed. 

A anall crew of men with pack train, under Assistant 
Chief Banger Harry Trisohman, left Headquarters on September 10 
to construct and repair snowshoe cabins for use of winter patrols. 
Extensive repairs were made to the cabins at Miller Creek and at 
Cold Creek, and a new cabin was built to take the rilace of the 
old one on Pelican Creek. 

A similar orew under Assistant Chief Banger Brooks, 
assisted by Banger Henry Anderson, built a new snowshoe cabin, or 
rest station, at Aster Creek, 12 miles south of Thumb Station. 
This is a cabin that will be used often by rangers passing back 
and forth between Snake Biver and Thumb Station, and therefore 
was built substantially. It consists of peeled logs for walls, 
shingled roof, floor of one inch boards, inside dimensions 14k x 16 
feet, two windows each 30 x 32 inches, and one door. The logs 
are chinked inside and plastered with cement outside in the cracks. 
The windows and door are doubly protected by heavy wooden shutters 
to keep bears from breaking in. The work was finished on October 
4. 



-6- 



(b) Maintenance and Repair of Physical Improvements . 

Sprinkling was discontinued on September 4th, and on 
the 5th and 6th they pulled drags over the roads, after the rains 
of September 5th, These sprinkling crews were then transferred 
to crews making road improvements. All maintenance work of fill- 
ing chuck holes and ruts was discontinued on the 6th, and all 
efforts were directed towards improvements. 

At Headquarters practically no improvements were made. 
One team and two men worked 16 days clearing brush off the forma- 
tion. All other help available was sent out to the park as 
replacements for the road crews. The l-l/4 miles of graveling 
at Norris, on the Mammoth to Sorris Hoad, is 90 per cent completed. 

In the south forest reserve a small bridge crew re- 
paired the concrete floor on the Snake River bridge, 2-1/2 miles 
south of the park boundary, This work was completed September 5th, 
and the crew moved to the Fishing Bridge, at the Yellowstone Lake 
outlet. 

the road crew camped at Pilgrim Creek has improved 3-1/2 
miles of road and the approaches to the Pilgrim Creek bridge. 

Artist Point roadwas improved; the sharp turns were re- 
moved and both approaches to the Chittenden bridge were improved. 
Material taken from the west approach to improve the sharp turn, 
was placed on the east approach to widen it. 

On the Dunraven Pass road two concrete culverts 4 x 42 
feet long were constructed, and 4 culvert3 2*3" x 4* were extended 
14 feet. There were 120 lineal feet of 18" galvanized iron 
culverts laid, and 180 feet of 24" galvanized iron culverts re- 
placed old wooden culverts. Two miles of widening were completed 
and tv/o small fills made over the two concrete culverts con- 
structed. 

A crew of 12 men made the fill over Seode Creek culvert 
on the Tower Falls to Manmoth road. 

In the east forest reserve a crew of 16 men rebuilt the 
30* span Guabarrel bridge, and completed the 60' of cribbing at 
Holm Lodge. Two miles of light road Improvement was made. This 
crew was called in on September 24. 

The fishing bridge at the Yellowstone Lake outlet has 
40 piles driven of the 72 to drive. 

-7» 



The Yellowstone Lake survey is 80 per cent completed. 
The Inspiration Point road was surveyed and the proposed change 
at tiie Lake hotel was surveyed. 

One and one-half miled of graveling was completed on 
the Norris to Ma-moth road. 

September 12 to 18 a small crew with pack train cleared 
out fallen timber and repaired the Delacy Creek trail 14 miles. 

(o) Miscellaneous IacroTement vork . 

A hay crew at Gardiner have been engaged since September 
8th in cutting, curing and stacking the oat hay on the field near 
the park entrance. This work has progressed hut slowly, due to 
the inclement weather. 

Another small crew with pack train made heavy repairs 
to the telephone line from Swan Lata Elats to the Gallatin Road, 
5 miles from Gallatin Station. Host of liiampoles, which had 
about rotted off, were reset over this stretch of 23 miles. 

The crew on Slough Creek finished putting up hay there 
for use of the surplus horses for the winter, and for feeding elk. 
A total of 250 tons were put in stack. 

A crew at the huf falo tun continued the work hegun 
earlier in the summer, of rebuilding the fences around the meadows 
and the corrals, chute and soueeae for 'aandling the huffalo. 
Ahout 3-1/4 miles of pasture fence was rebuilt. 

A surveyor, with three rren to assist, was engaged through- 
out the entire month in making a preliminary survey of Yellowstone 
Lake. This work was 80 per cent completed. The crew was recalled 
on account of bad weather on October 1st, and the surveyor is en- 
gaged in working up his report in the office. 

Annual estimates, to cover all activities proposed for 
the fiscal year 1921, were prepared and transmitted to the Service. 

(d) Service to the Public . 

Travel figures for the month of September, and for 
September 191V and 1918, are shown for comparison in the follow- 
ing tables: 



-8- 





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HAME 0? STATE 


HCBTH 


WEST 


EAST 


SOUTH 


TOTAL 


Arkansas 











1 


1 


Arizona 


2 











2 


Colorado 





2 


17 


2 


21 


California 


16 


15 







38 


Connecticut 













1 


Florida 


3 










3 


Georgia 













1 


Illinois 


13 


1 


12 





26 


Indiana 


6 










11 


Iowa 


21 


2 


14 





37 


Idaho 


4 


36 




9 


49 


Kansas 


3 


7 


14 





24 


Kentucky 













1 


Montana 


90 


47 


15 





152 


Massachusetts 


1 










2 


Maine 





1 







1 


Michigan 


10 







1 


16 


Missouri 





3 


10 





13 


Minnesota 


17 










21 


Hew York 


5 


1 







8 


Hew Mexico 













1 


Hew Jersey 













1 


Herada 





1 







1 


Nebraska 


5 


2 


13 


1 


21 


Horth Dakota 


11 


1 




1 


17 


Oklahoma 





2 




1 


8 


Ohio 


4 


2 







12 


Oregon 


10 


6 







19 


Pennsylrania 


2 





3 





5 


South Dakota 


15 





5 


1 


21 


Texas 





3 


5 





6 


Utah 





22 





1 


23 


Virginia 








2 





2 


Washington 


16 


e 


5 





31 


W isconsin 


11 


2 


4 





17 


Wyoming 


4 


4 


36 


10 


54 


West Virginia 








1 





1 


Canada 


4 











4 


New Hanroshire 


1 


o 


1 





2 


TOTALS: 


276 


168 


204 


28 


676 



-10- 



Copies of Chief Ranger's Travel Reports, for use in 
mating comparisons, are inclosed herewith. 

IV. WORK IN PROGRESS: 

Construction, general maintenance and repair work, as 
indicated under Division III. 

Preparatioii of annual reports covering the fiscal year 
1919 and the parksseason of 1919, is in progress. 

V. WORE BEGUN: 

The oniy work begun during the month of any special im- 
portance is as shovai under Division III, the most important being 
the extensive repairs to snowshoe cabins, and building of new ones 
where necessary. Preparations were also made to build a log cabin 
and a log barn on Slough Creek, where hay has been put up to 
winter surplus horses and to feed to elk, as it will be necessary 
to keep a :aan with the herd all winter to feed them and the elk. 

VI. PLANS OR PROPOSED V/ORK: 

Due to the fact that funds for new work are about ex- 
hausted, and there are only enough for current expenses and 
necessary work, incident to opening the roads and preparing for 
the park season next year, no work beyond the completion of some 
of the most necessary work in progress will be attempted. 

VII. POLICIES: 

No absolutely new policies have been adopted, but the 
policy of permitting dogs in the park under any conditions, and 
permitting hunting iiarties to pass through over trails, has been 
thoroughly discussed frora all angles, and orders issued tending 
to limit these practices to the least possible, necessary to pre- 
vent extreme inconvenience, or actual hardship. 

VIII. COS! OP OPERATION: 

A statement of costs of various features is not available 
for submission with this report. 

IX. OTHER MATTERS OF INTEREST: 

ild Anim als. 
The wild animals are all in fine condition. The unusual 
-11- 



rains and snow storms brought them down in large? numbers than they 
ordinarily come in September, and elk, deer and antelope were 
frequently seen along the road by tourists. Alfalfa hay to the 
extent of about 470 tons was purchased, the price ranging from 
$24 to $26 per ton in stack near the feeding grounds, to ,-32 per 
ton baled.. This, with about 400 tons already on hand, will be 
several times as much as ever before available for feeding wild 
aalmal8, and it is hoped will be sufficient for their needs. 

Bears frequented the ho tel and camp dump grounds, and 
since the hotel 3 and camps closed, and most of their food supply 
cut off, have become more of a nuisance than ever. 

Buffalo : Nothing was seen of the wild herd during the 
month. The tame herd was kept on the flats on Lamar River and in 
the adjoining hills. Six calves were born during the month, 
making a total of 88 calves born this season, of which 50 were 
males and 38 females. 

Fish . 

Fishing was fairly good in streams and lakes away from 
the automobile roads, although but few take the trouble to go 
there. A statement was received from the Yellowstone Park Camping 
Company to the effect that they took a total of 2,164 pounds of 
fish from park waters to supply the^oamps. these were taken in 
June and July, and, of course, rare inadequate to supply the full 
needs. A carload of Rainbow and Eastern Brook trout fry and finger- 
lings, furnished by the Bozeraan, Montana, branch of the United 
States Fish Hatchery, ./ore planted in park waters as follows: 



Caji£. 


Ho. Fish. 
12,500 


Tftflil of Fish. 


-here plant ed- 


10 


.-ir.bo.7 


Upper Gibbon. 


10 


12,500 


Rainbow 


Lower Gibbon. 


12 


15,000 


Rainbow 


Virginia lleadows. 






Gardiner 


River Y/aters. 


18 


16,250 


Rainbow 


Lupine Creek. 


10 


15,000 


Rainbow 


Glen Creek. 


14 


17,500 


Rainbow 


Panthre Creek. 


15 


4,125 


Eastern Brook 


Upper Firehole River. 


18 


4,950 


Eastern Brook 


Little Firehole River 


18 


4,950 


Eastern Brook 


Hex Peroe Creek. 


15 


4,125 


Eastern Brook 


Mallard Lake. 



-12- 



Arrests and. Violations of .£he Law. 

Only one arrest was made during the month, namely on 
September 5, Messrs. D. „. Case and Ii. E. Stevens were arrested 
by Sanger E. Matthew, for leaving their camp fire burning. They 
were tried before the United States Commissioner, plead guilty, and 
were fined ^5 each and costs. 

Forest Fires . 

On September 1 fires were still burning at Mountain Ash 
Creak, Grizzly Peak, Shoshone Geyser Basin, Phlox Creek, and Mirror 
Plateau, as reported for August; but heavy rains had them practi- 
cally extinguished, and the men whojfhad been fighting them were 
being returned to their work on roads, telephone lines, trails, 
etc., as rapidly as could be done with the transportation at hand. 
Ho further trouble was given by these fires. Two fires of con- 
siderable magnitude broke out the latter part of September, 
namely: 

One near the west line of the park 17 miles north from 
the western entrance on September 25. A small crew of rangers and 
men hired in the village of Yellowstone, Montana, for the purpose, 
was rushed to the scene and succeeded in getting it under good 
control on September 28, when a snowstorm came up and finished it 
in short order, after it had burned over about 200 acres of timber, 
which was not of much value. A careful investigation indicated 
that this fire was started from carelessness on the part of some 
men taking cattle through the park on the Gallatin County road, 
as the tracks of both cattle and 3addle horses were found at the 
point where it started. The Taylor Fork Cattle Company was per- 
mitted to take 900 head of cattle through on September 19 and 20, 
driving them from their summer range on Madison National Fore3t 
to their winter range on West Gallatin River. 

The second fire occurred on September 28, high in the 
mountains, not far from Pawn Pass, between Pawn Creek and the 
Gallatin Elver. It was extensive enough so it was seen from 
several miles away, but before the rangers who were sent to locate 
it arrived there, the heavy snow came on and they did not find it 
necessary to continue. This fire was remote from any sort of 
travel, and doubtless started from lightning. 

Accidents and Casualties . 

No accidents were reported during the month. 



-13- 



Specia l Visitors . 

Honorable Stephen T. Mather, Director of national Parks, 
visited the park officially September 8 to 12, inclusive, as 
follows: 

Arrived Cody 8th, and same evening he and I met Cody 
Club on Yellowstone Problems; September 9th to Lake Outlet to 
inspect camp improvements and proposed developments, and to Canyon 
for the night. September 10th to Old Faithful, via Thumb for 
lunch, thence to Mamnoth. September 11th at Mammoth on admin- 
istrative matters and estimates; met all employees in evening. 
September 12th, out Gardiner on evening train, 

Mr. G. E. Goodwin, Civil/Engineer, National Park Service, 
arrived on September 14th to assist in preparation of estirsates 
of all national parks. 

Mr. Charles P. Punchard, Jr., Landscape Engineer, 
national Park Service, was here from September 17 to 23, to take 
up certain landscape features in connection with Improvements in 
the park. 

Miss Elizabeth Prazier, writer for the Saturday Evening 
Post, spent several days, beginning September 14th, in the park, 
and I personally accompanied her around the park, into Jackson 
Hole and to the Buffalo Farm. 

Doctor Nicholas Murray Butler, President of Columbia 
University, September 7 to 10. 

Mr. Clifford C. Cassidy, i?raveler, Writer, Lecturer, and 
author of "Home and Abroad" series, September 6 to 8. 

Mr. C. J. Collins, Bureau of Service, National Parks 
and Monuments, Chicago, September 2 to 6, with American Express 
party of 50. 

Mr. Frederick Oederlin, Commercial Advisor and Member of 
the Swiss Legation in .ashing ton, D. C, September 3 and 4. 

Mr. Harry Dibble, Project Manager, United States 
Heclamation Service, September 10. 

Mr. E. C. Howard, fro- the Idaho Falls Office of the 
United States Geological Survey, 'iater Resources Branch, entered 
on September 5 to measure and inspect the water gauges in the park. 



-14- 



The Famous Players Lasky Company, of New York, finished 
their work in the park and departed. 

Mr. E. C. Sohoettner, of Butte, Montana, who holds 
permit dated August 19, to take moving pictures in the park, was 
here for a few days 'beginning September 5. 

X. RECEIPTS AND REMITTANCES: 

The usual report of monies collected, due, transmitted, 
etc., together with money orders and checks, totaling $522.00, as 
called for in the reports on Forms 10-59 and 10-60, is inclosed. 
Please acknowledge receipt. 

Cordially yours, 

HOUCB H AIBRI&HT 

Superintendent. 
Inclosures: 



-15- 





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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
WEATHER BUREAU 

Weather Conditions Mammoth Hot Springs. 

SEPTEMBER, 1919. 

temperature: Monthly mean, 52.0°, which is 1.4° below the 

normal for the month. Except the 21st, 27th and 

28th when the temperature was unusually low for th$ 

season, only moderate fluctuations above or below 

the normal occurred. 
Precipitation: Total, £.51 inches, or 1.50 inches above normal. 

With the exception of September, 1901, when 2.85 inches 

ware recorded, the total for this year is the greatest 

in thirty years' record. 
Snowfall: Total for the month, 7.9 inches, which is the greatest 

snowfall in the September record during a period of 

thirty yetrs. 
tfind: The wind was generally light with a maximum velocity 

of 30 miles from the south on the 11th. 
Sunshine: The sunshine was slightly below the averse for ±&h 

September, the percentage of the possible being 58. 



SHE. 



G. E. Lawton, 

Observer. 



October 11, 1919. 



Th* Director, 
national Paik Service, 
Department of .he Interior, 
ashington, D. C, 

Sir. 

Referring to monthly report from this office 
under date of October 10, 1919: 

There is transmitted herewith Chief Ranger's 
Moatfaly Report of travel for the month of Septa-nber, 
1919, which should havo accompanied my monthly report for 

September. 

Cordially yours, 

HUM r tMM '2 

Superintendent . 
Inclosure: 





STAISUEHT OF FISH PLANTED 




IN DIFFERENT .YATERS OF 




YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 




SEPTEMBER 3, 1919 




No. Pish. 


Kind of Pish. 


.here vlanted. 




12,500 


Rainbow 


Upper Gibbon. 




12,500 


Rainbow 


lower Sibbon. 




15,000 


Rainbow 


Virginia Meadows. 






Gardiner River Y/aters. 




16,250 


Rainbow 


lupine Creek. 




15,000 


Rainbow 


Glen Creek. 




1V.500 


Rainbow 


Panther Creek. 




S & J j 






4,125 


Eastern Brook 


Upper Pirehole River. 




4,950 


Eastern Brook 


Little Pirehole River. 




4,950 


Eastern Brook 


Nez Peroe Creek. 




4,125 


Eastern Brook 


Mallard Lake. 




' 8 I s